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Paley Center: Protecting Content & Promoting Innovation

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Tucktam Avatar
Tucktam
Posted: 04.19.12, 07:33 PM
I live in Australia. We get everything anywhere between 3 to 12 months after the US. By then I've usually lost interest. Anything I would have paid to access is no longer relevant.
Talshere Avatar
Talshere
Posted: 03.05.12, 05:08 PM
@Toffotin Agreed, cant believe the number of times I've gone to Hulu to watch something only to get that thrown in my face. Its not even like I live in a developing country, its the UK for gods sake, we couldn't be more copy-write friendly if we tried! The reality is companies hold onto the content for over extended periods of time, there is no excuse in this day and age for me to sit for 12 months after it airs in the US too see it in the UK. If this persists, people will pirate because the world is so connected now. Every day I can get it online after its officially aired in the US but not the UK, increases the chance of pirating. Even a week is arguably too long these days. Its harsh and petty but thats the way it is. Additionally, pricing is something of a joke in many countries, Ive spoken to many people who DO live in developing companies and the cost of this content is insane, US prices in a 2nd world, the majority of users cannot pay US prices for this content. This is endemic in the Games Industry. In the aim of TV programs, I dont see why these days publishers couldn't host the episode on their site indefinitely, with 1 or 2 ads at the start and end. At that point the ad revenue should more than make the profits and will do so globally. Many solo producers do this now on places like TwitchTV and JustinTV where they run an ad during down times and the revenue goes straight to them. Noone minds because you dont watch excessive quantities of ads and you want to see the content. Attacking the pirate sites is pointless until you fix the pricing and supply problems, I dont know one single person who knows how a computer work that hasnt pirated, yet itunes has proved emphatically that people, en mass, will chose convenient, legal content at a fair price over pirating.
Toffotin Avatar
Toffotin
Posted: 02.29.12, 06:00 AM
"Have you gone to Hulu? Have you gone to Hulu?" *I go to Hulu* "We're sorry, currently our video library can only be streamed within the United States"
GordenFreeman Avatar
GordenFreeman
Posted: 02.28.12, 01:57 AM
Quote: Originally Posted by meira.hand I have enjoyed the talk, but find it curious that all the trusties got their full names mentioned while the two guests were only referred to as Rick and Fred. No one bothered to introduce them by full name or tell us who they are, despite it being a streamed talk. They may be on first name basis with the people in the room but not to the online audience. Who are they? Agreed they should have had better introductions, but thankfully you can learn more about by clicking the 'bio' tab above the video.
GordenFreeman Avatar
GordenFreeman
Posted: 02.28.12, 01:52 AM
Interesting discussion, just a shame that its 5 years (some might argue a decade) too late. The discussion is still stuck in the 'pay for content' methodology of the 20th century and its relation to physical products. In the digital space this has limited relevance and will become less and less relevant as time goes by. If the big media corps don't get this soon, they will simply be over-taken by new content providers who do understand the 21st century digital distribution. There needs to be an acceptance that the vast amount of content produced by media companies has little to no value in the market. It never really did, just now the digital distribution and monitoring allows it to be clearly seen. Products were always supported by consumers who 'bought' (literally) into the IP. These consumers are still there and often they are happy to pay over the odds for content they 'believe' in (i.e have a passion for, want to be associated with etc). It is these consumers that the media companies need to work with, providing added value to those who 'purchase' the content. Make you content free or nearly free for the vast majority of consumers, but make your profits from those who want to support a specific product/IP. This is already happening in areas such as 'apps' where content is often given away for free, but through micro-payments (in-app payment) allow users to spend money on content they 'align' themselves with. Look at the success of Kickstarter and especially the Tim schafer/Double Fine adventure game, where publisher funding has been completely removed from the equation. Look at musicians who let their fans pay what they feel is a fair price for downloading an album or who give away their latest album for free, but offer an incentive of an exclusive t-shirt ( a physical product) at a cost for fans to buy. These are the new modern business approaches that are currently succeeding where the old media companies are failing.
meira.hand Avatar
meira.hand
Posted: 02.26.12, 08:47 AM
I have enjoyed the talk, but find it curious that all the trusties got their full names mentioned while the two guests were only referred to as Rick and Fred. No one bothered to introduce them by full name or tell us who they are, despite it being a streamed talk. They may be on first name basis with the people in the room but not to the online audience. Who are they?
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